The real impact of a organisational restructure

I’ve only ever written about this in my studies and while an essay offers different perspectives and ways of working with change it does not prepare you for the reality of the actual impact it has.

Restructure: bringing a drastic or fundamental internal change that alters the relationships between different components or elements of an organisation or system.

About a year ago a new CEO was brought on  and is now working to ‘change the way we work so we are better prepared for the future’. Our old organisational structure was a complete mess and it is fair to say that we have WAY to many people in leadership roles. I am sure I heard someone say the other day that over 200 people are either in a managerial or leadership role.

I totally agree with this. When I first started it was brought up in my first coaching session ‘do you want to look to leadership one day’ and I remember thinking why would I want to do the same thing everyone else is doing? It goes to show today that our previous CEO worked hard to develop our people into leadership. This has made redesigning our organisational structure a difficult task.

There is no way that they could make anyone redundant – especially in a election year being a government agency and all. BUT they have flattened the structure and disestablished managerial roles they don’t see bring ‘value’ to our organisation going forward. People who don’t hold a senior manager role have been ‘mapped’ to a team and a reporting line that allows us to work as ‘one agency’ and rids our silos. For the roles which have been disestablished the people attached to those roles have been through an expressions of interest process. It has been a very uncertain time and a waiting game.

In the process of expressions of interest people can give their preference to one- four roles within the new structure and are asked to do some insane psychometric testing that evaluates their strategic thinking and leadership ability. The few weeks following this become the longest waiting game of their life. They cannot determine whether they will hear today, tomorrow or next week. They finally hear either via the phone or via email on what role they have been given. It is up to them if they want to accept this or not…. They can say no, that is in their right but due to the organisation offering them a role they cant legally ask for redundancy #strategic if you ask me! They then have the hardest decision yet to either take the role they were given in hope it will make them happy to look for other work.

I currently manage our recruitment process in the contact centre and am a personal assistant to the manager who’s role has been disestablished. Many of us have been given mixed messages about our responsibilities within our current role changing in the new structure. It was confirmed just last Thursday that I have lost loads of scope in my current role which has me pretty disappointed. I have been placed in a pool of administration staff who are working to support ‘any manager’ – wow! It’s been tough trying to get my head around how they look at role titles and not the person in the role and to accept that they are changing our priorities.  This is a real shock and I have become quite upset about the whole thing.

It’s a tough time and a real eye opener. For me, I am making a connection to what I was taught at university. Only this time, its real not just a piece of written work.

Do I stick it out and hope that the scope of my role will get bigger? Do I take a risk and move into other work in another organisation?
Bridget x

 

 

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Driving your career forward

Have you ever been told by a lecturer at university that when you leave you will get a job in your desired field of study, 50-70 grand a year and a manager who takes the time to mentor you into a young professional? I was.

I was with the bulk majority who leave university with piling debt and no real direction as to what next. I was one in the thousands every year who leave with hope that a rewarding job finds them.

I applied for twenty jobs and did not hear back from any. I tried again a couple of months later and failed. I would get an interview and fail once again. Eventually I just gave up. It did not matter if I had awesome grades and a friendly, outgoing personality – its more than that in this fast paced, competitive economy. Employers want to know what you can bring to their organisation they do not currently have. Of course you google what it is they do, come up with some great idea/s around what it is you could bring to the table but if you do not have a plan from start to end with contingencies in mind you are no match for them.

“You can’t get a job because you don’t have experience” is a phrase you will hear all to often. “I can’t get experience because I can’t get a job” is what you will replay in your head.

Lets take it back to university… how important is the effort you put in to getting experience whilst at university? SO important! You observe and learn from others who have experience in a particular field. You learn what worked and what did not, question why, how and why not? This will separate you from the bulk majority. Developing networks is another key piece of advice I give to you because people know people who know of opportunities. This will separate you from the majority. Put yourself in the drivers seat of your own success. If you want that job, go for it. If you are not successful, ask the recruiting manager what it would take to be successful. This will separate you from some. Get involved in what you are passionate about- community events, fundraising events, culture, arts, music, business and innovation competitions. This will separate you from a few. Take a chance! This may mean moving cities, changing lifestyles, changing…you. Ensure you align your mindset with determination to create your own success and… accept that it may take you time to step up the ladder but you will get there. Stick it out!

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When I left university I created my first job in communications and events. I was using my degree, yes, but bound to a fixed term contract on $17 a hour. I was left to be autonomous and while I was more than capable at this, I failed. I forgot to ask for help and learn the ‘right from the wrong’ and as a result many of my outputs were only half achieved. I left this job in June 2015 and moved into my second job from university as a personal assistant/ recruitment coordinator. I am using my degree, bound to a permanent contract and  on $27 a hour. I have a manager who spends time listening to my questions and works with me to find the answer. I am autonomous and more than capable to deliver achievable outputs. How did I get here? I kept driving in the right direction.

If you ask the right questions, put in the effort, ask for more, learn and develop your skills in more than just your field of work I can guarantee your peers and leaders will respect you. Over time you will develop a well established brand and a reputation. If you go with what you think is right, stick with what you know and do not find the opportunities to grow yourself you become stuck.

Keep asking for more. Keep trying. Keep driving forward.

Bridget x