The real impact of a organisational restructure

I’ve only ever written about this in my studies and while an essay offers different perspectives and ways of working with change it does not prepare you for the reality of the actual impact it has.

Restructure: bringing a drastic or fundamental internal change that alters the relationships between different components or elements of an organisation or system.

About a year ago a new CEO was brought on  and is now working to ‘change the way we work so we are better prepared for the future’. Our old organisational structure was a complete mess and it is fair to say that we have WAY to many people in leadership roles. I am sure I heard someone say the other day that over 200 people are either in a managerial or leadership role.

I totally agree with this. When I first started it was brought up in my first coaching session ‘do you want to look to leadership one day’ and I remember thinking why would I want to do the same thing everyone else is doing? It goes to show today that our previous CEO worked hard to develop our people into leadership. This has made redesigning our organisational structure a difficult task.

There is no way that they could make anyone redundant – especially in a election year being a government agency and all. BUT they have flattened the structure and disestablished managerial roles they don’t see bring ‘value’ to our organisation going forward. People who don’t hold a senior manager role have been ‘mapped’ to a team and a reporting line that allows us to work as ‘one agency’ and rids our silos. For the roles which have been disestablished the people attached to those roles have been through an expressions of interest process. It has been a very uncertain time and a waiting game.

In the process of expressions of interest people can give their preference to one- four roles within the new structure and are asked to do some insane psychometric testing that evaluates their strategic thinking and leadership ability. The few weeks following this become the longest waiting game of their life. They cannot determine whether they will hear today, tomorrow or next week. They finally hear either via the phone or via email on what role they have been given. It is up to them if they want to accept this or not…. They can say no, that is in their right but due to the organisation offering them a role they cant legally ask for redundancy #strategic if you ask me! They then have the hardest decision yet to either take the role they were given in hope it will make them happy to look for other work.

I currently manage our recruitment process in the contact centre and am a personal assistant to the manager who’s role has been disestablished. Many of us have been given mixed messages about our responsibilities within our current role changing in the new structure. It was confirmed just last Thursday that I have lost loads of scope in my current role which has me pretty disappointed. I have been placed in a pool of administration staff who are working to support ‘any manager’ – wow! It’s been tough trying to get my head around how they look at role titles and not the person in the role and to accept that they are changing our priorities.  This is a real shock and I have become quite upset about the whole thing.

It’s a tough time and a real eye opener. For me, I am making a connection to what I was taught at university. Only this time, its real not just a piece of written work.

Do I stick it out and hope that the scope of my role will get bigger? Do I take a risk and move into other work in another organisation?
Bridget x

 

 

Another Kiwi Moving to London?

So, in typical Shayla fashion I have decided that I want to move to London. Why do I want to go there? Because of the history, the opportunities and the adventure. It’s also because I’m getting married in 3 months and I’ve owned my own home for a few years now.. I don’t want to spend the rest of my “youth” in my hometown when we have the perfect chance to experience a new life overseas. I’m terrified that one day I will wake up in my forties and regret not seeing the world before surrendering my life the usual 9-5, white picket fence and 2.5 kids. I can’t do that to myself. 

My husband to be is onboard which is half the battle, however this decision has become somewhat soul destroying because as he’s pointed out, we literally cannot leave NZ for nearly 2 years. TWO. FRICKEN. YEARS. I am a reckless person. I love to make rash decisions but due to the current state of my house and the impending wedding – I have to hold my horses and just wait it out until we have enough savings to achieve all that we need to next year. Having a sensible other half comes in handy but it also means facing reality head on when all you want to do is run away. 

We have to replace our bathroom thanks to the previous owners neglect (goodbye $15k) and we also need to finish our outstanding renovations such as the office that we 75% completed back in 2015 and then just left it because we couldn’t be bothered anymore – who does that?! 

Hint: We do. We suck.

Not only do we need to save around $20k to actually move, we also have to find the funds to finish off old projects and get the house ready to sell (or rent) so we can confidently leave. 

It’s so hard having a long term goal when you’re impatient and crave instant gratification. The rough date we’ve picked to head off is December 2018 (two years was a slight exaggeration) and we’ll have to live like paupers for the next 20 months to make it happen. Unless I change my mind, which is stupidly common in this household. 

How do you find long term goals? Are you impatient like me or do you enjoy having the time to plan? I’d also love to hear about your experiences with moving overseas!

Fuck it, we’re eloping.

In April 2016, the love of my life asked me to marry him. I was thrilled and we couldn’t wait to jump headfirst into planning our wedding. I wanted to become his wife as soon as possible. I was quickly knocked back a peg or two as I entered the crazy world of wedding planning.

I fell for the traditions like a total sucker. I was in full big white wedding mode. I joined a wedding group on Facebook, started pinning ideas on Pinterest, booked a gorgeous historical venue with in-house catering, stunning gardens, capacity for 100 guests, and even a personal wedding planner. I looked up wedding favors so I could give my guests a tiny trinket to remember our day, booked a photographer, wrote up my guest list, planned invitations, got my dress and then suddenly it dawned on me that the day I was planning wasn’t what I wanted.. I’m a terribly shy person and this is going to be the most intimate day of my life – I want privacy and above all else, practicality.

Wedding planning for those of you that haven’t experienced it, can be a fucking nightmare. People will try to dictate your day, your invite list grows out of control because there are people who you must invite (like a family member that has never met your partner nor seen you for 6 years but because they share blood with you they have to come – WTF?). The cost is nuts too. If I said to you that I was planning to spend $18,000 on my party next Saturday, you would probably think I was a fucking insane, however if I tell you my wedding is only going to cost $18,000 – you’ll probably think “oh, that’s not bad”. For some reason, we as a society accept that the cost of a wedding should be in the realms of a house deposit.

We’d paid a few of our vendors and told our friends and family that we were doing the big white wedding. We had a tough decision to make – we were going to backtrack everything we had shared with our loved ones about our plans. After many long conversations with my partner, we agreed to cancel the planned day because we just didn’t envision ourselves in it. It dawned on us that we were following the normal standards for a wedding because we didn’t know any better. We have been exposed to over the top, expensive, flashy weddings in movies, people we know spend an average of $30,000 on their day and we were just conforming. It wasn’t true to us in the slightest.

We’re now eloping, and I couldn’t be happier.


Here are my few pieces of advice for the newly engaged:

1. Identify what is truly important to you and your partner

What matters the most to you and what are your nonnegotiables? Do you guys have strong bonds with family therefore need to invite everyone? Do you want to do it on the cheap because you’re saving for a house deposit? Do you want to take out a loan so you can afford the wedding of your dreams or do you want to be debt free on the other side? A clear understanding of both of your expectations will make the planning process much easier and it will save you from changing your mind and feeling like a bit of a dick later on.

2. Skip the bullshit

You only need a celebrant and 2 witnesses to be legally wed in NZ. Anything else is just an extra. You literally do not need to have a colour theme, photo booth, 3 course meal, bar tab, heck – you don’t even need to have bridesmaids if you don’t want to. There is absolutely nothing wrong with wanting all of those things, but don’t feel pressured into having your wedding a certain way just because everyone else does. Your wedding, your way.

3. Create a detailed (and realistic) budget

You already know this one. Weddings aren’t cheap. But creating a robust budget and sticking to it will help you stay on track, and keep you grounded. Regardless of how much money you want to spend, identify clear goals and have a plan of how you will reach them. Saving $100 a week quickly adds up to $5200 a year, so work out what you can afford to save and stick to it. This savings calculator is a great tool to see the realistic outcome of what you need to save each week to hit your goal.

4. No matter what I, or anyone else says, do what is best for you and your partner

If you can afford the next Kim K wedding, fucking go for it. That’s sick. If you want to run away to Vegas, or the courthouse – go for it. At the end of the day you are marrying your best friend and that is all that matters.  The rest is just a nice extra.


How is your wedding planning going? Or if you’re married, what was your experience like? I’d love to hear the thoughts of other couples.

Far from paradise

Last week Shayla and I embarked on our first journey to the pacific islands. We spent loads of time on google researching what we could do while on our holiday. We had this picture in our minds that reflected paradise.

After a month planning we flew three hours to reach our destination.

There is something about looking out a small oval window above the trees and clouds that is so exciting. It is as if you have never seen anything like it before. Well I guess we hadn’t.

Our first 24hours in Tonga – let me get creative here. We drove through living nightmares to reach the so called paradise.

Don’t get me wrong the sun was out, the heat was definitely in our face but this was no lively city. Imagine driving from the airport in the dark passing street markets, dogs and passing poverty. We drove on a back road in a small rental car with at 10kms over endless potholes and no street lights – good one google maps. We reached our accommodation one hour later – it should have taken you 30mins.

Our accommodation was right on the beach shore – the evident crashing of waves made the situation a little better. We could not wait to wake up in the morning to watch the sunset whilst lying on the beach.

Sunday morning.

We woke at 2pm, 4pm and 6am- the heat was not our cup of tea.  Our baked beans and cold fried eggs awaits us on our official wake at 9am. What a fantastic start to our paradise.

The next few days were much the same. We were hot. We were hungry. We were tired.

We drove for a hour a day passing houses with no windows and sheets for doors. We had only just missed some street dogs that own the roads- there were some that would not move and the way they engage eye contact with you truly speaks a desire for death. Many people stand at markets looking to get food at a reasonable price.

Now I could journal all the exciting things we did while in Tonga and believe me we saw some beautiful beaches, travelled to some beautiful islands and swam in caves but I will stop there. Tonga, like many of the cook islands and other countries around the world open your eyes to reality beyond our own. This year I have bought a new phone, laptop and Ipad so I can be up with new technology and in the know. What was going to happen if I did not get any of those new gadgets, probably nothing. Why did I? Because I know no different. The media tell us too. Our friends tell us to. Most importantly we tell ourselves we have to. My highest moments this year revolve around new toys such as the above. My lowest was realising that the people I saw in Tonga were never going to know how wealthy we live in countries like New Zealand. They live each day with what they have and in the conditions they are.

No one is equal. No one is ever always happy. We are who we can be.

Tonga.PNG

The untold

 

The risk I took, I never told. 

A few years ago I let go of my biggest fear of my life. As a child I had a traumatic experience that involved a cliffe, rocks and deep cold water. You are going to think I am crazy. I did the one thing they tell you not to do- trigger bad memories on purpose. I fronted up to my fear and to my memory.

I went back to where it all happened. Some days it took me time to get out of the car. Some days I forced myself out and others I did a circle and drove home again. For those days that I made it out of the car I walked up to the edge of the cliffe and took a seat. With no-one around me all I could hear was the sound of the waves crash against the rocks. Talk about triggering a memory. There was mini panic attacks, loads of tears and some screaming but I did it. At 20, going on 21, I was able to walk up to that cliffe and breathe normally. The fear was gone. The memory, not so much, but hey least I was not afraid anymore.

Would a councillor have told me to face my trauma, no. Would my family and friends support you, probably not.  Did I take a risk, yes.

Lesson learnt: They will call themselves experts but the councillors, parents and friends in your world do not understand you like you. Make your own decisions for a better you.

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Advice I wish I was given

 

Lots of confusing and stressful things happen while you’re growing up. Here are 10 pieces of advice I wish I was given:

  1. Some friends will come and go. They’re going to stick around for the parts of your life where they’re needed. You will learn many lessons from them, including how to get hair dye off of your bathroom sink and the importance of keeping your nose out of other peoples business.
  2. You’re about to meet some people that will be your friends for the long haul. You will go through almost every experience together. You’ll sneak out and go to parties, you’ll try new things together, you’ll make mistakes, you’ll fight, but oh how you will laugh. Cherish the good times. One day you will see them get married, reach their goals, and you’ll know that they’ll always be there for the important moments.
  3. Sex should always be consensual. You shouldn’t be forced into doing anything that makes you feel uncomfortable, and you partner should respect your boundaries. Losing your virginity at 13 is something you will learn to accept, but you’ll never stop regretting it. One night stands aren’t really your jam either, you care too much about feeling loved.
  4. University is not for everyone. While you are more than intelligent enough, you are a bit too flaky to commit to a long term goal. You should save your energy for your career, as you won’t actually end up needing that degree for a successful future.
  5. It’s okay to cry yourself to sleep if you need to. Life is fucking hard, and sometimes crying makes you feel better. When it feels like the weight of the world is on your shoulders, it’s nice to be able to release those feelings. However it’s not okay to cry yourself to sleep every single night. A constant state of sadness could potentially point to mental health issues, depression being one of them. Antidepressants and counselling can really help you to overcome your obstacles, talk to your doctor asap.
  6. Be a fucking kid. Don’t be so eager to grow up. One day you will wake up in your mid twenties and realize that you never went to a school ball because you were so determined to be an adult and earn an income. If you prioritize and idolize “growing up,” you won’t stop to be a teenager.
  7. Orange foundation doesn’t look good on anyone. You can skip this stage by visiting a make up counter at the mall and getting them to match you to one of their products. As awful as you think you look in retrospect, keep all of your photos. They will bring you so much joy as you get older.
  8. Drinking on an empty stomach will fuck you up. You’ll behave in ways that you will regret, and it’s completely avoidable by eating something before or while you get boozed. You will push your friends away because of your behavior and it will take a while to regain their trust. Maccas is open 24/7, there is no need to be an asshole.
  9. You’re going to fall in love many times. Each boy will teach you something new about yourself and your limits. No matter how hard you try, most of these relationships will crumble. Insecurity and jealousy will be your worst enemies. They’ll creep up on you on both sides of the relationship. You will be accused of things you didn’t do, but that’s not your problem – it’s theirs. You’ll try and get out as soon as you can (but you won’t, you’ll stick around a bit longer even when you know it’s wrong).
  10. Know when to give up. There will be a guy that embodies everything you think you want in a partner, but he won’t be. You will sit and wait for his texts or his calls, and one day they’ll just stop. He’ll use you for a lot of things, but this will define what you will accept in a relationship moving forward. You will never let yourself be wrapped around someones finger again. You will learn to speak up if you’re unhappy. You’ll never be afraid to express your feelings again.

What advice do you wish somebody had given you when you were younger?

His version of a heartbreak

Shes saying things she doesn’t mean
Threatens to leave
Blames me for her unhappiness
Stays out late
Distances herself

She won’t talk
Walks right past
Avoids conversation
There is no time for me

~

Today she left me
Cold and alone
Her belongings scattered
Taking what was needed
Was gone before I made it home

I fall to the ground
Head in my hands
My chest tightens
Eyes swell

~

I haven’t heard from her
Where is she?
I dial her number
but never make the call

Numb the feeling
Spend nights gaming
Long days working
Girls every weekend

Lets keep pretending
Nothing is wrong

~

She messaged me
I sensed relief
I feel hurt
This is worse.

Shes saying she means what she says
Wants to return
Apologises for the blame games
Promises commitment
Brings herself back to me

~REPEAT~